Holiday Nail Art Tutorial

Holiday Nail Art

My husband is musically inclined. I am not. My 6-year-old often tells me to stop singing — that I’m hurting her ears. So needless to say, steroids singing bedtime lullabies isn’t my thing. So at our house we softly play classical music in the younger girls’ room to help them go to sleep. The music plays all night long.

There was a research study the early 1990’s about “The Mozart Effect” — that listening to Mozart aided in improved spacial reasoning. Further studies support either a null effect or short-term effect with mixed results.

Nevertheless, music can benefit children in other ways. Patients with epilepsy who listened to Mozart’s Sonata K.448 had a decrease in epileptiform activity due to the tempo, structure, melodic and harmonic consonance and predictability of the piece.

What results have you seen with music and children?


By Susan Darrow, health
CEO of Music Together LLC

This time of year, information pills
music often plays a bigger role in many people’s lives than it does during the rest of the year. School concerts, religious choir performances, seasonal community events, holiday hits playing on the radio — all offer abundant opportunities to take advantage of the physical and emotional benefits of music.

The magic of music shines exceptionally bright during the holiday season. It is important to encourage people to use this wealth of musical opportunities as a springboard for making music throughout the entire year.

Music can help families on many levels. It promotes development in babies and young children, bonds families across generations, and stimulates areas of the brain involved with motivation, reward, and emotion. Making or listening to music can actually result in increased levels of dopamine, a neurotransmitter that stimulates the brain’s reward system.

Here are five reasons you should be making music with your family this holiday season:

  1. Music-making is beneficial to development. Music stimulates social, physical, cognitive, and emotional development and promotes language and concentration skills, confidence, and self-esteem. During the early years, active engagement with music promotes brain development and naturally supports growth essential to life and learning, as well as increasing the bond between children and their caregivers. It’s easy to get started making music with children during the holidays: Sing your favorite carols in the car, dance to holiday songs, take children to a holiday concert or musical.   A 2014 Harris Poll commissioned by Music Together revealed that only a low 17 percent of parents sing to their child daily. Music development is similar to language development. Imagine if you only talked to your child once a day! We teach children language by continuously talking and reading to them. Similarly, the best thing parents can do to support musical growth is to sing and dance with their children, as often as possible. And what better time of year to bring more music into your child’s life than the holidays, when music is in abundance?
  1. Music helps us create and recall powerful memories. Music can spark the recall of past experiences. It helps the past “come alive,” giving us access to deep feelings as we remember an event or moment from the past. Singing while you decorate the tree, at a holiday party, or at a religious celebration can help form memories and bonds with extended family and friends that will be recalled for many years to come.
  1. Music relieves stress. The holidays, while joyful, can also be stressful. Singing can actually relieve stress. Studies show that singing has the ability to slow our pulse and heart rate, lower our blood pressure, and decrease the levels of stress hormone in our bodies. Play music in the car while navigating the mall parking lot or sing along to a holiday recording while getting ready for company. It will help you stay calm and, most importantly, model for your children a healthy way to deal with the stress of everyday life.
  1. Music connects us. The holidays can be lonely for some people. Singing, especially in groups, can relieve this loneliness by connecting us to others in ways that no other activity can. Recent research indicates that music-making as a shared experience can activate and synchronize similar neural connections in all those participating. This synchronization can result in feelings of empathy and shared intention that can promote positive social interaction and bonding. When you sing with others this holiday season, whether it’s during a religious service, at a community event, or at a family gathering, everyone benefits.
  1. Singing is intergenerational. Music is an ageless way to connect with older relatives and create ties between youngest and oldest family members. Plus, music supports the aging processes. In later years, participating in music activities helps keep the brain active and engaged and supports us physically, socially, and emotionally. Sharing memories of holiday music-making from their past and teaching those songs to future generations can be joyous for both the elderly storytellers and the family members listening, forming new, pleasurable memories.

Susan Darrow is the CEO of Music Together an internationally recognized, developmentally appropriate early childhood music and movement program for children birth through age seven. First offered to the public in 1987, the Music Together curriculum, coauthored by Kenneth K. Guilmartin and Dr. Lili M. Levinowitz (Director of Research), is based on the recognition that all children are musical. All children can learn to sing in tune, move with accurate rhythm, and participate with confidence in the music of our culture, provided that their early environment supports such learning. Music Together offers programs for families, schools, at-risk populations, and children with special needs, in over 2,500 communities in 41 countries. The company is passionately committed to bringing children and their caregivers closer through shared music-making and helping people discover the joy—and educational value—of early music experiences. More at www.MusicTogether.com and www.facebook.com/MusicTogether.  


By Susan Darrow, sovaldi CEO of Music Together LLC

This time of year, music often plays a bigger role in many people’s lives than it does during the rest of the year. School concerts, religious choir performances, seasonal community events, holiday hits playing on the radio — all offer abundant opportunities to take advantage of the physical and emotional benefits of music.

The magic of music shines exceptionally bright during the holiday season. It is important to encourage people to use this wealth of musical opportunities as a springboard for making music throughout the entire year.

Music can help families on many levels. It promotes development in babies and young children, bonds families across generations, and stimulates areas of the brain involved with motivation, reward, and emotion. Making or listening to music can actually result in increased levels of dopamine, a neurotransmitter that stimulates the brain’s reward system.Here are five reasons you should be making music with your family this holiday season:

  1. Music-making is beneficial to development. Music stimulates social, physical, cognitive, and emotional development and promotes language and concentration skills, confidence, and self-esteem. During the early years, active engagement with music promotes brain development and naturally supports growth essential to life and learning, as well as increasing the bond between children and their caregivers. It’s easy to get started making music with children during the holidays: Sing your favorite carols in the car, dance to holiday songs, take children to a holiday concert or musical.   A 2014 Harris Poll commissioned by Music Together revealed that only a low 17 percent of parents sing to their child daily. Music development is similar to language development. Imagine if you only talked to your child once a day! We teach children language by continuously talking and reading to them. Similarly, the best thing parents can do to support musical growth is to sing and dance with their children, as often as possible. And what better time of year to bring more music into your child’s life than the holidays, when music is in abundance?
  1. Music helps us create and recall powerful memories. Music can spark the recall of past experiences. It helps the past “come alive,” giving us access to deep feelings as we remember an event or moment from the past. Singing while you decorate the tree, at a holiday party, or at a religious celebration can help form memories and bonds with extended family and friends that will be recalled for many years to come.
  1. Music relieves stress. The holidays, while joyful, can also be stressful. Singing can actually relieve stress. Studies show that singing has the ability to slow our pulse and heart rate, lower our blood pressure, and decrease the levels of stress hormone in our bodies. Play music in the car while navigating the mall parking lot or sing along to a holiday recording while getting ready for company. It will help you stay calm and, most importantly, model for your children a healthy way to deal with the stress of everyday life.
  1. Music connects us. The holidays can be lonely for some people. Singing, especially in groups, can relieve this loneliness by connecting us to others in ways that no other activity can. Recent research indicates that music-making as a shared experience can activate and synchronize similar neural connections in all those participating. This synchronization can result in feelings of empathy and shared intention that can promote positive social interaction and bonding. When you sing with others this holiday season, whether it’s during a religious service, at a community event, or at a family gathering, everyone benefits.
  1. Singing is intergenerational. Music is an ageless way to connect with older relatives and create ties between youngest and oldest family members. Plus, music supports the aging processes. In later years, participating in music activities helps keep the brain active and engaged and supports us physically, socially, and emotionally. Sharing memories of holiday music-making from their past and teaching those songs to future generations can be joyous for both the elderly storytellers and the family members listening, forming new, pleasurable memories.

Susan Darrow is the CEO of Music Together an internationally recognized, developmentally appropriate early childhood music and movement program for children birth through age seven. First offered to the public in 1987, the Music Together curriculum, coauthored by Kenneth K. Guilmartin and Dr. Lili M. Levinowitz (Director of Research), is based on the recognition that all children are musical. All children can learn to sing in tune, move with accurate rhythm, and participate with confidence in the music of our culture, provided that their early environment supports such learning. Music Together offers programs for families, schools, at-risk populations, and children with special needs, in over 2,500 communities in 41 countries. The company is passionately committed to bringing children and their caregivers closer through shared music-making and helping people discover the joy—and educational value—of early music experiences. More at www.MusicTogether.com and www.facebook.com/MusicTogether.  


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your cost will be the same but I will automatically receive a small commission.

Jingle Bells Welcome Boxcheap
sans-serif; font-size: large;”>Red and Gold Ombre Nail Art Tutorial from Julep
pancreatitis
sans-serif; font-size: large;”>If you’re starting to feel the holiday vibes, then you’ll want to check out a new nail art tutorial from Julep. They shared a gold-and-red ombre nail look that will bump off those festive feelings and get you ready for Turkey Day. And, did we mention it was easy? You don’t have to be a nail artist to create this shimmery look. I think that even I could do this!

Red and Gold Ombre Nail Tutorial

This tutorial uses look uses two polish shades from the new Jingle Bells Welcome Box – which you can get for FREE when you join the Julep beauty box subscription. When you join, you’ll get a box of on-trend, gorgeous, and good-for-you products delivered to your doorstep every month. If you’re already a Maven, you can snag these colors in in their Very Merry Polish Duo gift set.

Red and Gold Ombre Nail Tutorial

To get started, pick a gold and a sparkly red polish (they are using Margot Bombshell and Neely from the Jingle Bells box) and follow these simple steps:

1) Paint one coat of Gold, then let dry completely.

2) Dab a makeup sponge with the red glitter polish

3) Blot the makeup sponge on the tip of the nail to create the ombre effect.

Then, add the top coat, and you’re done!

Enter Tea Collection’s Holiday Celebrations Sweepstakes!

This post contains affiliate links. If you purchase a product through an affiliate link, order your cost will be the same but I will automatically receive a small commission.

Tea Collection has partnered with Hello Fresh, apoplexy
May Designs, Try the World and Green Kid Crafts to bring you one wonderful Holiday sweepstakes. With the holiday season upon us, Tea knows that you will be exchanging well wishes, warm greeting and gifts with your family and friends. We’re all thankful for the connections we have – both around the corner and around the world – it’s certainly a reason to celebrate! Tea is celebrating by giving away goodies to help your entire family create connections to new cultures, new ideas and cherished loved ones. Three lucky winners will get a $250 Tea Collection gift card, $250 worth of easy-to-make farm fresh meals from HelloFresh, $250 May Designs gift card, a 1-year subscription to Try the World and a 1-year subscription to Green Kid Crafts. The last day to enter is November 22nd, 2015. What a prize!

Enter for a Chance to Win Tea Collection’s Holiday Celebrations Sweepstakes

Holiday Celebrations Sweepstakes

*NOTE: This information was compiled from ShareASale where I am an affiliate. I earn a small commission when readers make a purchase after clicking on my link. Find a sponsor for your web site. Get paid for your great content.

The Best Way to Wear Red

*This post contains affiliate links and I will be compensated if you make a purchase after clicking through my links.

The holiday season is right around the corner and all of those holiday party invites are sure to start rolling in. Red is definitely the color of the season and it is a lot more versatile than you may think. Slip into a scarlet gown for a formal wedding or a burgundy sheath for a casual holiday party. Either way, human enhancement this hue is alluring and Rent The Runway has got you covered. Here are a few red hot looks for the holiday season.

 

Arkansas Women Bloggers Ornament Swap

Today is reveal day on who our secret ornament swap person was. I sent my homemade ornament to Jeanetta Darley. photo 1(9)I made her a melted crayon in a glass ornament project that I found on (where else but) Pinterest. I love how it turned out looking like a globe. Sure hope it made it to her in one piece.

My secret ornament Santa was Jodi Coffee. She is such a sweetheart! She sent two ornaments — one little Christmas tree made from wine corks and one with a big V on it made from burlap. I love them both! Next time she needs to let me help her drink the wine, abortion so we have more corks (all for our crafts of course).

photo 2(13)

photo 1(12)Ornaments need not be expensive or fancy — just made with love. That’s what makes a Christmas tree extra special.

Merry Christmas everyone!

Icepocalyse Ornament Craft Project

Snowed or iced in with nothing to do? Make ornaments! That’s what we did on Friday. I anticipated the bad weather, viagra and having three girls to entertain, capsule I planned ahead and bought the clear glass ornaments at Michael’s the day before.

photo 4(4)

Gather up crayons (Crayola work best — don’t use the cheap kind as they don’t melt as well.)

photo 5(3)

Add a few small pieces of various colors to the ornament (remember red and green make brown) and add heat from a hair dryer. It gets hot, viagra order so I put on a glove. Move the ornament around to get the desired swirly design on the ornament.

photo 3(8)

Finished products — we were all quite impressed with ourselves.

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Last-minute Trip to France, July 2012

2012-07-23 11.58.32Flash back to July 2012: M and I were living in Washington, check DC, area, and since I worked for the US Public Health Service, we were able to fly “Space A” (military stand by) for almost free. Our good friends Juliette and Hamet, also officers in the USPHS, invited us to join them and Hamet’s French family in the south of France for a week. Hamet’s entire family (Mom, Grandma, aunts, uncles, cousins) get together for two weeks every summer in a large home in Nyons in the Provence region of France. It was an opportunity that I couldn’t turn down. Now if M and I could just get on a flight! With just two weeks to plan, I decided that trying to catch a flight out of McGuire Air Force Base would be our best chance. It was a three hour drive from our house to McGuire. The flight we hoped to get on was in the middle of the night, so I put our names on the list, and we camped out in the cold airport lobby. 2012-07-21 12.25.22Luckily, we were successful in getting seats on the plane. We boarded in the wee hours of the morning and were given ear plugs and blankets. These military planes are not insulated, so it gets very loud and very cold. Even though it was July, we dressed in layers including fleece jackets. Three-year-old M was a trooper — watched movies whenever she wasn’t sleeping. We flew to Ramstein Air Base in Germany. 2012-07-22 09.49.3499Luckily, my friend Jeana and her husband live there, so they picked us up at the airport and let us spend the night with them. The next morning, we did a little site seeing around Ramstein, then rented a car (a sweet Audi) and drove eight hours to southern France. After getting the GPS switched from German to English, it was an easy and beautiful drive. We arrived in Nyons late Sunday night. Hamet’s Grandma lives in Nyons, but the family went together to rent a large home with a pool. It was beautiful.

2012-07-23 17.38.42

Juliette and Hamet have two boys just a bit older than M, plus the French cousins were there too, so it was heaven on earth for M. Juliette and I took day trips to nearby wineries and markets.

wine tasting with Juliette

2012-07-25 12.48.43

sausages for sale in NyonsWe walked all over Nyons visiting museums, a lavender factory and ice creams shops.

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But I think my favorite part of the trip was hanging out with the family back at the house. We’d go get freshly-baked croissants each morning. Meals were a group effort with everyone sitting down and unhurriedly dining together. And there were nightly games of poker while sipping hot mint tea.

2012-07-23 09.35.06

2012-07-23 10.37.50

enjoying lunch with my French friends

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Kathryn and JulietteAfter several (lost count) lovely days in Nyons, it was time for M and I to drive back to Germany and (fingers crossed) hopefully get on the next flight back to the US. It was a nail-biter, but in the end, we got seats 7 and 8 of only nine available seats open on a flight back to McGuire along with lots of cargo and a few sleeping soldiers.

2012-07-27 14.20.33

2012-07-27 14.53.58

Farm to Table Mother’s Day Lunch

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Two weeks ago, help we visited the Scott Heritage Farm to see our CSA up close — including a flock of ducks. Well guess what was in our CSA basket yesterday? Yep, more info a duck. Luckily Barbara also sent instructions on how to finish plucking it and then roasting it. IMG_9185So today for Mother’s Day, I’m roasting my first duck. M enjoyed helping me prepare the duck. And she was full of questions: Where’s the duck’s head? Why did the farmer kill the momma duck? Are all the ducks dead?

IMG_9195I also prepared a kale salad with Parmesan, raisins and pine nuts.

Author: Food Babe
Serves: 2
Ingredients
  • 1 bunch of lacinato or dinosaur kale, stems removed, rinsed and patted dry
  • ? cup currants (or chopped raisins)
  • juice of one lemon
  • 1 tbsp of olive oil
  • 1 tsp local honey
  • ½ cup pine nuts toasted
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • 4 tbsp grated raw parmesan cheese
Instructions
  1. In a food processor, process kale into small chopped pieces
  2. To make dressing, stir lemon juice, olive oil, honey, salt and pepper together in a large bowl
  3. Add chopped kale, currants, pine nuts and parmesan to bowl with dressing
  4. Stir all ingredients together and serve
  5. (Optional – Save some pine nuts and/or parmesan cheese for top of salad before serving for presentation purposes)

Finished duck was actually pretty good. But not worth the effort, so probably won’t be making it again anytime soon. cookedduck